Pet Wellness Services

Ivy Square Pet CareWhy Is Regular Wellness Care for My Pet
So Important?

Prevention is the key to your pet's long- term health. The veterinarians and medical team at Animal Hospital of Ivy Square recommend that your pet receives a complete wellness examination once per year as a young adult, and twice per year as an older patient.

Regular examinations are our chance to assess your pet's overall health, discuss any changes we see, educate and update you on advancements in medical care and for you to discuss any concerns or questions. If a health problem or issue can be detected in its early stages, there is a far greater likelihood it can be resolved and treated with less difficulty, less expense and greater success.

Wellness for Every Age and Stage

When you bring your pet to Animal Hospital of Ivy Square, we work with you to create a lifetime preventive health care plan based on your pet's breed, lifestyle, age and risk factors.

Due to the many recent discoveries and innovations in veterinary medicine, your pet can be protected against many infectious diseases. Vaccinations and preventative diagnostic tests are important for keeping pets healthy and free from disease. Your veterinarian will determine a vaccination protocol based on your pet's lifestyle, susceptibility to disease, our geographic location, and the most current recommendations from the American Veterinary Medical Association. Our shared goal to is to maintain your pet’s optimal health.


Feline Life Stage Health Care Recommendations

(Click for downloadable PDF)


Kitten (<6 months)

Core Wellness Plan

  • Full physical exam every 4 weeks until 16 weeks of age.
  • Felv/FIV test at first visit.
  • Repeat Felv and Ftlv test at 6 months of age.
  • Fecal parasite test. Deworm every 4 weeks until 16 weeks.
  • FVRCP at 8, 12, 16 weeks, or every 4 weeks until at least 16 weeks of age.
  • Rabies at 16 weeks
  • Felv vaccine at 12 and 16 weeks.
  • Heartworm prevention year round in all cats. Indoor cats are also at risk for heartworm disease.
  • Flea/tick control year round. Begin at 8 weeks of age.

Special procedures

  • • Spay/Neuter at 5-6 months of age.
  • • Preanesthetic blood work.
  • • Microchip with Home Again at time of spay or neuter, or earlier if desired.
  • • Begin adult diet at 1 year of age. Feed a combination of recommended Canned and Dry diets.

Adult Cat (1 – 7 years)

Core Wellness Plan

  • Comprehensive physical examination yearly.
  • Purvax Rabies yearly.
  • FVRCP vaccine boosted after first year, then every three years. Feline Panleukopenia vaccine titer annually is optional during off years, using the validated test at KSU.
  • FeLV vaccine yearly if at risk of exposure (outdoors or exposure to FeLV unknown cats). If no risk of exposure boost FeLV 1 year from initial vaccines and discontinue immunization.
  • FeLV/FIV test yearly if outdoors or at risk of exposure.
  • Fecal test and purge deworming yearly.
  • Heartworm, flea/tick prevention year round.

Special Procedures

  • • Junior Health Screen blood screen every year – CBC, Chemistry (Junior wellness blood test, heartworm test).
  • • Dental cleaning as needed and dental health checks annually.




Senior Adult Cat (8 – 11 years)

Core Wellness Plan

  • Full physical exam every 6 months
  • Monitor weight changes, arthritis signs, changes in thirst, urination.
  • Discuss age related diet changes, e.g. senior diet.
  • Modify vaccine schedule for age and lifestyle.
  • Rabies yearly.
  • FVRCP every 3 years. Feline parvovirus (panleukopenia) titer annually is optional during off years, using the validated test at KSU.
  • Felv vaccine yearly if at risk of exposure.
  • FeLV/FIV test yearly if at risk of exposure.
  • Fecal Test and deworming yearly
  • Heartworm, flea/tick prevention year round.

Special Procedures

  • • Senior Health Screen yearly (CBC, chemistry, electrolytes, thyroid, urinalysis)
  • • Blood pressure measurement yearly is optional.
  • • Screening thoracic and abdominal radiographs is optional.
  • • Dental cleaning as needed.
  • • Heartworm test yearly.

Golden Years (>11 years)

Core Wellness Plan

  • Comprehensive physical exam every 6 months.
  • Monitor weight changes.
  • Discuss age related diet changes, e.g. senior diet.
  • Preventive dental care.
  • Felv/FIV test yearly if outdoors or at risk.
  • Fecal Test and deworming yearly
  • Heartworm, flea/tick prevention year round.
  • FVRCP every 3 years.
  • FeLV vaccine every year if at risk of exposure.
  • Rabies yearly with Purvax.

Special Procedures

  • • Senior Health Screen yearly (CBC, chemistry, electrolytes, thyroid, urinalysis).
  • • Blood pressure measurement yearly is optional.
  • • Thoracic and abdominal radiographs yearly are recommended.
  • • Dental cleaning as needed.
  • • Heartworm test yearly






Canine Life Stage Health Care Recommendations

(Click for downloadable PDF)


Puppies (<12 months)

Core Wellness Plan

  • Physical exam every 4 weeks until 16 weeks of age.
  • Fecal Parasite Evaluation.
  • Deworming every 3-4 weeks until at least 16 weeks.
  • DAPP vaccine at 8, 12, 16 weeks.
  • Lyme Vaccine at 12, 16 weeks for patients at risk.
  • Lepto 4 Vaccine at 12, 16 weeks.
  • Boost every year. Do not use in breeds of dog with hypersensitivity to this vaccine.
  • Bordatella Intranasal vaccine at 12 weeks. If Bordatella is given earlier, boost at 12 weeks of age. Boost every 6-12 months. Or Bordatella SQ. Boost in 2-4 weeks, then annually (at least 12 weeks of age).
  • Rabies vaccine at 16 weeks.
  • Heartworm prevention monthly year round.
  • Flea/tick control year round.

Special Procedures

  • Spay/Neuter at 5-6 months of age for most dogs.
  • Giant Breed Dogs spay and neuter at 10-12 months.
  • •Pre- anesthetic bloodwork
  •  Microchip: Home Again at any time, recommended at spay or neuter.
  • • Split Lepto and Lyme Vaccines by 2 weeks.
  • • Vaccines are site- specific.

Adult Dog (1 – 7 years)

Core Wellness Plan

  • Comprehensive physical examination yearly
  • Formulate appropriate vaccine schedule for life style
  • Discuss dental care
  • Rabies vaccine 1 year from initial vaccination, then every 3 years for life.
  • DAPP vaccine 1 year from initial series, then every 3 years for life.
  • Leptospirosis Vaccine yearly depending upon risk factors.
  • Bordetella vaccine intranasal every 6-12 months. Alternatively, Bordatella SQ once per year.
  • Lyme Vaccine yearly for pets at risk.
  • Heartworm and Tick Parasite screen yearly.
  • Fecal Parasite Evaluation + deworming yearly.
  • Continue heartworm, flea, tick and intestinal parasite prevention year round.

Special Procedures

  • • Junior wellness screening labwork every year – CBC, Chemistry.
  • • Vaccine titer instead of DAPP is optional.
  • • Dental cleaning as needed.
  • • Giant Breeds move to Senior Care at 5 years of age.
  • • Split Lyme and Lepto Vaccines if possible.


Senior Dog (>7 years)

Core Wellness Plan

  • Full physical exam every 6 months
  • Monitor for weight changes
  • Discuss age related diet changes appropriate for age and lifestyle
  • Discuss dental care
  • Discuss ongoing health problems
  • Discuss arthritis and pain management
  • Rabies vaccine every 3 years
  • DAPP vaccine every 3 years. Distemper and Parvo vaccine titer yearly is offered as an alternative.
  • Lepto vaccine yearly if at risk of exposure.
  • Bordatella vaccine intranasal every 6-12 months. Alternatively, Bordatella SQ once per year.
  • Lyme Vaccine yearly for pets at risk.
  • Heartworm and Tick Parasite Screen yearly.
  • Fecal Parasite Evaluation + deworming yearly.
  • Continue heartworm, flea, tick and intestinal parasite prevention year round.

Special Procedures

  • • Full Senior Health Screen yearly (CBC, chemistry, electrolytes, urinalysis, and Thyroid level)
  • • Antibody titer instead of DAPP vaccine is optional.
  • • Thoracic and abdominal radiographs yearly.
  • • Electrocardiogram yearly is optional.
  • • Dental cleaning as needed.
  • • Glaucoma check at time of physical examination.
  • • Abdominal Ultrasound is recommended for breeds at risk for Splenic and other Neoplasia (e.g. Golden Retrievers, Rottweilers, Labrador Retrievers, Dobermans, and German Shepherds, and others) and isoptional.
  • • Split Lyme and Lepto vaccines if possible


At your first visit with your new puppy or kitten, you will also receive a special welcome kit. This kit is filled with valuable health care and behavior training information about your newest family member. Each kit also includes a free month of heartworm and flea prevention.

During each examination throughout your pet's life, we remain committed to listening to your concerns, answering your questions, and keeping you up-to-date on all the information you need to be the best caregiver to your pet. Good communication between you and your pet's doctor is an important way to ensure your beloved companion is receiving the care and attention needed for a long, healthy life.

Your Pet's Golden Years at Home

As for your senior pet, there's an important role for you to play as your pet's primary caregiver. While you cannot control age-related decline, you can influence your pet's activity level, living conditions, access to quality senior veterinary care, and daily nutrition. Following these helpful tips will help preserve your pet's quality of life:

Senior Pet Care
  • Avoid excessive weight gain. Talk to your veterinarian about the sources of your pet's daily calories and avoid treats that are high in fat and sodium.
  • Keep your pet's living and areas clean, dry and warm at all times.
  • If possible, regularly check your pet's mouth for reddened gums, loose teeth or unusual swellings. Check eyes for redness, unusual cloudiness, discomfort and discharge. Check ears for wax build-up, discharge or unusual odors.
  • Thoroughly groom and inspect your older pet's skin regularly. Look for lumps, bumps and wounds.
  • If your older pet's eyesight is impaired, avoid relocating furniture and changing his or her surroundings. Also, try not to drastically change your pet's daily routine.
  • Any changes associated with eating, drinking or elimination should be noted and discussed with your veterinarian, as these may be indicate disease.
  • Take your older pet for regular senior checkups, even if he or she seems to be well. It is always easier and less expensive to prevent a problem rather than treat a problem.

The best time to begin your pet's senior care program and recognize the need for a little extra TLC is well before age-related conditions begin to set in. We can make sure you and your faithful companion enjoy many more happy and healthy years together.

Parasite Prevention

Fleas and ticks are more than a nuisance; they carry diseases dangerous to both you and your pet.

Prevalent tick-borne diseases in Charlottesville include Lyme Disease and Ehrlichiosis, which can be significant threats to you and your dog, especially during the warmer months of the year. Ticks and tick eggs live in the grass and weeds. Check and brush your dog after being outside, especially in grassy or brushy areas. If a tick is attached to your dog's skin, remove it carefully with tweezers and wash the affected bite area and your hands afterward.

Parasite Prevention for Dogs and CatsFleas are most abundant during the warm weather; however, if left untreated, they can be a problem year-round. In fact, flea infestation is one of the most common medical problems veterinarians see. Your pet can be allergic to fleas, and just one bite can result in a severely painful skin infection. Fleas can also transmit serious diseases such as bartonellosis (the bacteria that causes “cat scratch disease” in people), and parasites like tapeworms.

The best course of action to protect your pet and yourself from fleas, ticks, and the potential of tick-borne disease is prevention. The latest flea and tick control products are available at our hospital. Your veterinarian can help you choose the correct preventive regimen based on your pet's exposure risks, home environment and health status.

For your convenience, we also provide home delivery of these products on a one-time or reoccurring basis. You can also purchase individual doses of Heartworm and flea and tick preventative medications to ensure your pet is never without protection.

Protecting Your Pet from Heartworm Disease

Heartworm disease is a serious, life-threatening disease transmitted by mosquitoes. It affects dogs and, to a lesser extent, cats. Although Heartworm disease is most common along the Atlantic and Gulf coasts from the Gulf of Mexico to New Jersey and along the Mississippi River and its major tributaries, today it is found almost everywhere in the continental United States.

To best protect your pet's health, our veterinarians recommend heartworm preventives despite the infrequency of the disease in our area. The same medicine the prevents Heartworms from developing also kills and prevents other types of intestinal worms that can infect your dog or cat. For dogs, a once-a-month Heartworm preventive can be given as a chewable treat. Cats are protected by applying a drop of heartworm prevention liquid to the skin once a month.

Pocket PetsPocket Pets

We offer optimum wellness care programs for rabbits, guinea pigs, hamsters, gerbils, rats and mice. Since it is often difficult to determine if one of these pets is ill, we strongly recommend physical examinations twice a year to check for health problems, plus annual monitoring to check for nutritional and husbandry-related conditions.

To survive attacks from their predators, these small animals normally conceal their illnesses in the wild. As a result, their medical problems often go unnoticed for long periods. By the time you recognize there is a problem with your pet, the condition is often extremely serious. With bi-annual medical examinations by a veterinarian at Animal Hospital of Ivy Square, problems are often diagnosed before they become serious medical conditions.

After acquiring your new exotic pet, a complete wellness appointment is strongly recommended. This exam includes a thorough physical examination, husbandry and nutritional consultation, disease screening and laboratory testing if necessary. Before bringing your pet into your home, make certain that he or she is healthy.


If you would like more information about the veterinary wellness services Animal Hospital of Ivy Square offers for your pet or to schedule an appointment at our animal hospital in Charlottesville, please call our office at (434) 295-8387 (VETS).